Covid-19 vaccine roll out extended in Lincolnshire, as part of biggest NHS immunisation programme

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Hundreds of local vaccination services run by family doctors and their teams will open across England this week, as the roll out of the biggest vaccination programme in NHS history gains further momentum.

Practices in more than 100 parts of the country are taking delivery of the vaccine as of Monday, with the majority of national clinics starting on Tuesday including in Lincolnshire.

Groups of health providers including primary care networks and GP practices are setting up local vaccination centres. In Lincolnshire this will begin Tuesday with the opening of community sites in Louth and Grantham.

Nurses, paramedics, pharmacists and other NHS staff will work alongside GPs to vaccinate those aged 80 and over, as well as care home workers and residents, identified as priority groups for the life-saving vaccine.

The NHS will contact people in the priority groups when it is their turn to receive the vaccine.

Dr Dave Baker, GP and South West Lincolnshire Locality Lead, NHS Lincolnshire CCG, said:

“Healthcare professionals are already playing a key role across Lincolnshire in protecting people against coronavirus, and will continue to do so as the vaccination is rolled out to more people over the coming weeks and months.

 

“This is the greatest vaccination programme ever undertaken by the NHS and, to help vaccinate people safely we will be working with local communities to deliver it in convenient and familiar settings. This is a huge national effort to protect our patients against the virus and I would urge the public to come forward when they are called up for the vaccine.”

The community sites due to launch on Tuesday in Louth and Grantham build on the work of the scores of hospital hubs which have already started vaccinating, with 90-year old Margaret Keenan receiving her first dose to become a global trailblazer in Coventry last Tuesday.

The latest phase of the vaccine roll-out is being co-ordinated by GP-led primary care networks with more practices and community pharmacies in other parts of England joining on a phased basis during December and in the coming months.

Martin Fahy, Director of Nursing and Quality, NHS Lincolnshire CCG, said:

“Our healthcare professionals are about to embark on an enormous challenge, delivering the Covid-19 vaccination programme in the community whilst also delivering the expanded flu vaccine programme and the usual care and services our patients rely on us for.

 

“There are also logistical challenges but general practice has an excellent track record of delivering mass vaccination programmes, and we want to use this experience to help protect people from Covid-19 and start getting life back to normal again. We won’t be vaccinating everyone all at once – it will be a relatively small number at first – but as long as there is supply, GPs and our teams at selected sites will start vaccinating people this week, starting with our most vulnerable patients.

 

“Patients will be contacted and invited for vaccination – we would urge them not to contact their practice enquiring about vaccination, we will contact them.”

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The information below is extracted from the NHS website on 18 December, for the latest information visit this link. https://nhs.uk/covidvaccine

Coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine

The coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine is safe and effective. It gives you the best protection against coronavirus.

Who can get the COVID-19 vaccine

The NHS is currently offering the COVID-19 vaccine to people most at risk from coronavirus.

The vaccine is being offered in some hospitals and hundreds of local vaccination centres run by GPs.

It’s being given to:

  • some people aged 80 and over who already have a hospital appointment in the next few weeks
  • people who live or work in care homes
  • health care workers at high risk

The vaccine will be offered more widely, and at other locations, as soon as possible.

The order in which people will be offered the vaccine is based on advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

Read the latest JCVI advice on priority groups for the COVID-19 vaccination on GOV.UK

Advice if you’re of childbearing age, pregnant or breastfeeding

You should wait to have the COVID-19 vaccine:

  • if you’re pregnant – you should wait until you’ve had your baby
  • if you’re breastfeeding – you should wait until you’ve stopped breastfeeding

If you have the vaccine, you should not get pregnant for at least 2 months after having the 2nd dose.

If you later find out you were pregnant when you had the COVID-19 vaccine, do not worry. The vaccine cannot give you or your baby COVID-19.

There’s no evidence it’s unsafe if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. But more evidence is needed before you can be offered the vaccine.

Read the latest COVID-19 vaccine advice if you’re pregnant, may get pregnant or are breastfeeding on GOV.UK

How the COVID-19 vaccine is given

The COVID-19 vaccine is given as an injection into your upper arm.

It’s given as 2 doses, at least 21 days apart.

How safe is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The COVID-19 vaccine approved for use in the UK was developed by Pfizer/BioNTech.

It has met strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness set out by the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Any coronavirus vaccine that is approved must go through all the clinical trials and safety checks all other licensed medicines go through. The MHRA follows international standards of safety.

Other vaccines are being developed. They will only be available on the NHS once they have been thoroughly tested to make sure they are safe and effective.

So far, thousands of people have been given a COVID-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects, such as allergic reactions, have been very rare. No long-term complications have been reported.

Read about the approved Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for COVID-19 by MHRA on GOV.UK

How effective is the COVID-19 vaccine?

After having both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine most people will be protected against coronavirus.

It takes a few weeks after getting the 2nd dose for it to work.

There is a small chance you might still get coronavirus even if you have the vaccine.

This means it is important to:

  • continue to follow social distancing guidance
  • if you can, wear something that covers your nose and mouth in places where it’s hard to stay away from other people

Information: Read more about why vaccines are safe and important, including how they work and what they contain.

COVID-19 vaccine side effects

Most side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are mild and should not last longer than a week, such as:

  • a sore arm where the needle went in
  • feeling tired
  • a headache
  • feeling achy

You can take painkillers, such as paracetamol, if you need to.

If you have a high temperature you may have coronavirus or another infection.

If your symptoms get worse or you are worried, call 111.

Allergic reactionsTell staff before you are vaccinated if you have ever had a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis).

You should not have the vaccine if you’ve ever had a serious allergic reaction to medicines, vaccines or food.

If you do have a reaction to the vaccine, it usually happens in minutes. Staff giving the vaccine are trained to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

Read the latest COVID-19 vaccine advice if you have a history of allergies by MHRA on GOV.UK

Covid-19 vaccine roll out extended in Lincolnshire, as part of biggest NHS immunisation programme